Compleat Idler, Education, Technology, Writing and diction

Trademarks

(c) 2012 Earl L. Haehl Permission is given to use this article in whole as long as credit is given. Book rights are reserved.

Back when I could still afford MAD magazine there was a parody of product placement in films. And the one that entered my mind and lodged there to exit my mouth at inappropriate times was a battle field where the Cavalry had gotten the short end of the stick (I used to love those) and a scout rides up and says, “Over there is General Custer with a VanHeusen through his chest.”

Certain trademarks have entered the language as generic terms. Who says, “Hand me a soft tissue?” No, the term used is Kleenex, a registered term of Kimberly-Clarke or whoever currently owns the trademark.

I made the mistake of referring to a restored 1943 Ford utility vehicle as a jeep in front of a Chrysler salesman and was informed that the term as registered. “So, my uncle’s Willys is not a Jeep? Jeep was not a generic term back in 1943? There were never Jeeps before 1987?”

Also during the second world war, they began using an adhesive tape with strong cotton duck backing and after the war, Manco trademarked the name Duck Tape. Similarly, 3-M has guarded the Scotch Tape Brand.

In my favorite local Mexican restaurant I will order Mexican Coke with my meal. They provide the product made by Coca-Cola in Mexico with sugar rather than high-fructose corn syrup (a product of farm subsidies). I have yet to hear the waiter respond the way the order phone responded when my buddy, then a vice-cop, asked for a coke at a drive-in. “Will that be wet or fluffy?” So far the Coca-Cola corporation has not sued any of the major cartels for copyright infringement on “Mexican coke” or the advertising slogan “things go better with coke.”

In the old Soviet Union there were a number of companies making counterfeit Leica cameras. There are a number of finely crafted ones and there are a number of collectors, including (so I am told) some employees of Leitz Optical. Cameras and optics became Leica some time in the nineties leaving the Leitz corporation to some fairly complicated electronic products. Also, at one point all 35mm double frame rangefinder cameras were called Leicas—then other companies began to push their own branding.

The Soviet Union also marketed (to avoid trademark problems—patents are another matter) a camera very similar to a Pentax K1000 with a Nikon bayonet mount. They also had what looked like a Nikon FM with a Pentax K mount. The real temptation was a Kiev 6×6 which was more or less (mostly less) compatible with Hasselblad.

China—what can you say about a country that has looser point of origin labeling than Germany—built an M-14 clone. Looks right, magazines and ammo compatible, good price point. Parts were not interchangeable.

So be aware that branding and trademark are tools of restricting competition.

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Free Society

I came out–Fighting

(c) 2012  Earl L Haehl Permission is granted to redistribute this in whole as long as credit is given.  Book rights are reserved.

Let me put this in perspective.  I write as loboviejo because I like the concept of being an old wolf–there is a great deal of wisdom in a council of wolves.  I consider the three little pigs to be feral swine.

There is a great debate going on in this country right now.  We are being led by an establishment that wants to continue the travel into a totalitarian world government with the kleptocracy of the UN Secretariat at the center.   And there are some working specifically for the dictatorship of the proletariat to run this country.  They attack capitalism which has not really existed in this country since the Coolidge administration.

So the Washington Post is covering the DISCLOSE Act debate.  The gist of it is that the Republicans are blocking the transparency needed to make politics accountable.  What they are attempting to block is a bill that would create an “enemies list” for any president.  No amount of spending or advocacy is going to neutralize the inherent advantage of incumbency–the only way for a challenger to get that much coverage would be to get pulling off the heist of the Century and Ben Bernanke already did that.

So the comments are basically the glories of transparency versus the evil Republicans who probably get billions in undisclosed….   Let’s be real.  Harry Reid wants power.  Harry Reid wants to know who is giving money to opponents of his program.  Same with Barack Obama.   Same with any number of incumbents.

So here is my comment.

Here is the deal. There organizations on both sides of the political spectrum who engage in harassment of those they disagree with. Some have been known to enter upon private property to intimidate the family of an executive of a company they disagree with. President John Adams sent thugs to “punish” opponents of his war and even those who dared insult his management style. Richard Nixon had a list of enemies whom he attempted to bring down the powers of the Government on. Abraham Lincoln had opponents jailed.

Anonymity is a tradition in American politics from Silence Dogood and Poor Richard to “an Englishman” to Publius, Cato and Brutus. I see no reason for the FEC to collect an enemies list for whoever gets elected. I will make this easy for the Progressives. My name is Earl Haehl, my blog is loboviejo.com, I am a Republican and I oppose any assault on the Bill of Rights.

Ultimately the fight is one that will go to the side with the most popular support–the Supreme Court has the tradition of Hugo Black opposing any infringement on the first amendment alongside the tradition of William O Douglas who had a much looser definition of necessity.

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Compleat Idler

Idler’s Kitchen Mass Prep Burgers

(c) 2012  Earl L Haehl – Permission is granted to redistribute this in whole as long as credit is given.  Book rights are reserved.

I spent much of the holiday in the kitchen. The objective is to go beyond making just enough burgers for the meal and not have to do this again until fall. Last fall I used beaucoup Cabela’s Club points and obtained a Gamesaver Silver vacuum sealer which has simplified meals. If I need something I can open the freezer. I can buy chicken thighs, pork chops or ground beef on sale and use it until it is once again on sale. The kids have not taken a deer since I got it, but it is going to happen. Now, the stuff you need for one of these burgerama moments in addition to the gamesaver is probably in your kitchen already:

*  A four or five quart mixing bowl or prep tray is essential. The bowls come in pyrex or stainless—stainless is much lighter and less cleanup if you drop it. Do not use plastic when dealing with meat unless you like cleaning with a lot of bleach and worrying if there is some food particle residue in the absorbent surface. The commercial prep trays come in stainless or a food grade plastic. The mixing bowls are available at your grocery or local discount store. The prep trays are available where they sell the better grade and commercial food processing equipment.

*  A burger press is nice. I am closer to 70 than 60 and have only used the press a couple of years. It has made a difference in the time I spend and added some uniformity. The 5/8 to ¾ inch thick patties cook best in cast iron which is my utensil of preference.

*  Wide aluminum foil or butcher/freezer paper to protect the counter from the processing and the meat from the counter.

*  A paring knife—okay I could use the BenchMade in my pocket, but there issues as to where it has been. This opens up a three, five or ten pound tube of ground beef. (Yes, I do have a grinder but time is money. See Einstein’s alternative E=MC2/C$=T$.)

*  Clean rubber gloves. I picked up a box of powderless nitrile gloves in the first aid pain control aisle.

NOTE: I had a bottle of water but the water of life should wait until the job is done. It boils down to the following principle: When offering a keg party for your students to paint your garage, do not open the keg until the job is done. I might also here note that while I foolishly bought some quart and gallon bags for the vac-sealer, the rolls are better for sizing bags.

If you are like me you will probably have dehydrated chopped onions and coarse ground black pepper. It’s better not to try grinding two tablespoons of black pepper or chopping fresh onions the night before.

THE RECIPE I USED

Ingredients:

2 – three pound tubes ground round. I use the leanest cut available. When Angus is on sale I use. Bison (Tatonka) is never on sale. 1½ cups of dehydrated chopped onions. According to my son Oso Penzey’s has some fantastic dehydrated shallots.

1 to 2 (or maybe 3 depending) Tablespoons of coarse-ground black pepper. My preference is Tellichery. Alternatively, you can use some ground Ancho for the southwestern palate.

Mix ingredients together in the mixing bowl.  Be sure that the pepper does not clump.  It is a good idea to use wax patty papers to keep the patties apart and the burger press clean.

As I wrote when I left the blood-bait on the desk of a friend (after asking the cashier if they had crackers to go with it), “Bon appetit!”

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Free Society

Capital Gains are imaginary, but taxed anyway

(c) 2012  Earl L Haehl – Permission is granted to redistribute this in whole as long as credit is given.  Book rights are reserved.

Capital gains occur when the value of property changes in dollars. This can be due to value added to the property through the efforts of the owner, changes in value due to market forces such as scarcity or demand or changes due to inflation or government action.  While there are those searching for revenue who define this as income, this is a change in the value of property, not income.

The first may example may be the fixer-upper house that a person buys for its market value when it has, through neglect, vandalism, natural disaster etc., lost much of its value. While no one actually buys a house, but rather the real estate upon which it sits—except in the case of a condo. But the condition of a dwelling or other building on the premises impact what will be paid for the land. The person buying as investment had better know what it will cost.

Hypothetical 1: In 1986 we looked at what would be ideal for a couple writers who had the wherewithal to handle the utilities, stairs etc. As we walked through the place, I noted the wiring—at least $10,000 to make it fire safe, double that for computers. I would have gone through it with a plumbing contractor as well, but as we stepped outside I noted a foundational crack. The hypothetical person (Hyp1) who bought the house at a bargain price was going to spend an additional two to three times in upgrades. So look at the house at $50,000 (remember this was 1986) plus $125,000 (conservative) in repairs and then it gets sold in the bubble for a quarter million. It was purchased at fair market value, it was sold at fair market value. What was sold was the property for which Hyp1 sold not only the house for which $175k was the cost basis, but also the future use of the property and the fact that a comparable or greater price would be necessary to replace it.

Hypothetical 2: So in October 1987 a different hypothetical buyer purchased 100 shares XYZ Corp at $29. This was fair market value the day after the big correction. But the income from the stock was solid and the seller had panicked. In other words the fair market value was impacted buy panic, not performance but it was still fair market value on that day. I March of 1998 our hypothetical buyer decided to get into the burgeoning green energy industry so he looked at his XYZ that had split twice and was now valued at $129 with a cost basis of $80 since the last split. Hyp2 sold 200 shares and was bought Greeniecorp which filed bankruptcy in December. Had he not taken the bath on Greeniecorp he would have paid capital gains tax on $9,800. In selling those shares Hyp2 sold all future interest and income that would accrue to those shares, not merely notes.

The second category involves market forces. And it still involves purchase and sale at fair market value. In this case, the ultimate seller relinquishes the value and future interests as well as the property itself.

In the third scenario, inflation or other government action, there is no change in the value of the property—there is a devaluation of the money. To call the change in price a gain is wrong. The government has, through its actions change the value of the exchange and should not benefit by taxing the difference.

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Uncategorized

People’s Rights (?) Amendment

(c) Earl L. Haehl  Permission is given to use this article in whole as long as credit is given.  Book rights are reserved.

Imagine waking up and dealing with the fact that your email account has been used as a conduit of really insipid spam. And then you decide to do a run through of the morning’s news. The usual inching toward an unjustified and stupid war on Iran because the current occupant of the White House does not understand history or geopolitics well enough to evaluate what his venal advisers tell him. Either that or he is with the Wilsonian program of military adventurism to spread “democracy” throughout the world. Then, on infowars.com you pick up Nancy Pelosi nattering about amending the constitution to “undo” the damage the Supreme Court did in Citizens United.

If you want to read their story here is the link.

http://www.infowars.com/nancy-pelosi-wants-to-amend-the-first-amendment/

So the basic idea is that the “founders” intended this to be a democracy and the Supreme Court had thwarted that dream by allowing the “slime” of big money to control our elections.

Let’s get rid of some assumptions.

Let’s talk about how democratic our Constitution really is.

“The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, (chosen by the Legislature thereof,)…” The words in parentheses were unfortunately removed by the Seventeenth Amendment, thereby making Senators the least accountable public servants outside TSA. Federal Judges serve during good behavior and Congress has power to impeach. Prior to 1913, a Senator could be removed by a legislative resolution—no signature by the governor needed. This is not Democracy, but rather a shield against democracy.

And as to whether the “Founders” intended a democracy, I will quote one of my two favorite members of the Convention, Benjamin Franklin. A woman approach Dr Franklin and said something to the effect of, “So what have you given us, Dr Franklin, a democracy or a monarchy?” Dr Franklin answered, “a Republic madam, if you can keep it.”

Ms Pelosi wants to convince Americans that this is a democracy subject to the will and tyranny of the majority rather than a constitutional republic where there are restrictions upon governmental powers.  She fails in this.

My other favorite member of the Convention is George Mason who walked out without signing the document because it did not include rights. His actions galvanized the anti-federalist movement to demand a Bill of Rights. No, the first amendment was not the idea of the founders, but of the anti-federalist faction.

Hamilton, Jay, Madison, Washington, John Adams were opposed to the Bill of Rights. The first four believed it to be unnecessary although Madison “came around” after time “in the woodshed” with Jefferson and Mason. Adams was a reluctant Patriot—he believed that the President should have absolute power in emergencies and that the country needed an army rather than a militia (except for the armed thugs he sent out to deal with his enemies in the press). In Massachusetts it fell to others, primarily Sam Adams, Elbridge Gerry and Mercy Otis Warren to fight for ratification of the Bill of Rights.

New York, where Governor George Clinton prevailed over Hamilton, and Virginia, led by Patrick Henry, insisted on the amendments we now call the Bill of Rights as condition precedent to remaining in the compact—these were the days before Daniel Webster claimed the Union was indissoluble. Without New York and Virginia, the United States would have foundered.

Ms Pelosi is a hack politician, who like so many on both ends of that road from the Capitol to the Executive Mansion, lacks a grounding in history and the Constitution. The “Peoples’ Rights Amendment” reads as follows:

Section 1. We the people who ordain and establish this Constitution intend the rights protected by this Constitution to be the rights of natural persons.

Section 2. People, person, or persons as used in this Constitution does not include corporations, limited liability companies or other corporate entities established by the laws of any state, the United States, or any foreign state, and such corporate entities are subject to such regulation as the people, through their elected state and federal representatives, deem reasonable and are otherwise consistent with the powers of Congress and the States under this Constitution.

Section 3. Nothing contained herein shall be construed to limit the people’s rights of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, free exercise of religion, and such other rights of the people, which rights are inalienable.

This reads like a high-school debate topic. What this lacks is the prohibitory nature of the First Amendment which reads:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

To be absolutely honest, the Democrats who are responsible for this do not realize that:

1. Congress will no longer be prohibited from establishing a religion, as long as it permits free exercise. In other words, the establishment of secularism like France with the universal ban on public display becomes possible. Rights provided by the government may also be regulated by the government.
2. The people’s rights presumes a collective, rather than an individual right. Such rights, if spelled out, become rights granted rather than rights recognized. There is difference. This basically allows the regulation of rights in which they become privileges.
3. If a corporate entity is no longer recognized as a legal person, then it can neither sue nor be sued because it does not exist. It could not be held liable in tort nor could it be liable to pay fines or taxes. Nor for that matter could it be outlawed. The non-profits that both sides of the spectrum use to run surveys and disseminate both information and disinformation would have no corporate being to receive funds.

There are probably, among the sponsors, some who understand the consequences fully and would merely assume all corporate powers into agencies of the government—the United States could have as efficient an economy as the Soviet Union.

UPDATE 07MAY2012

Having read George Will I see the author of this travesty is Rep Jim McGovern (D-Mass). That the author is from Massachusetts should really surprise no one. Massachusetts is home to John Adams, Second President of the United states and reluctant member of the committee that wrote the Declaration of Independence. It is not that John (unlike his smarter Cousin Sam) was happy with the King but rather that he would have preferred a Cromwell type rebellion. John Adams, while President, ignored the Bill of Rights and sent thugs to punish his enemies in the press. B.F. Bache, publisher of the Philadelphia Aurora and grandson of Benjamin Franklin, was beaten severely and his press significantly damaged. He was unable to return to publishing.

Mr McGovern would do well to emulate John’s smarter cousin Sam and his anti-federalist colleagues Elbridge Gerry and Mercy Otis Warren who pushed the limitations on government which protect us from the “tyranny of the majority,”

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Compleat Idler, Education, Free Society, Humor

Political Seasons

(c) 2012 Earl L. Haehl Permission is given to use this article in whole as long as credit is given. Book rights are reserved.

The Kansas Republican Caucuses are over, and with them the robo-calls.  I did get one call from a person during the run-up.  I happened to answer it and it was a poll.  Fortunately I had the right answer (Ron Paul) and it was a very short call.  At that point I quit answering the land line–anyone I want to call me has my cell number (XXX-XXX-XXXX).  So the calls are over until after the Conventions when we will get hit with–I don’t want to know.

Then there is the junk mail.   My wife has been getting surveys from various groups since last September at least reminding her to “renew” her membership in various committees she has never been a member of.  As a Democrat she gets letters from Nancy Pelosi. Joe Biden. Michelle Obama and sometimes even President Obama.  She also gets mail from every Democratically affiliated organization.  And every one contains an important survey or petition along with a request for money and a reminder of the doom which will befall the country if President Obama is not reelected.

Since I am registered Republican (I did register as a Democrat a couple of times to participate in a primary but that’s just a Kansas thing) I have not been getting much from the Party.  This may be due to the fact that they take me for granted, but it’s probably because they don’t have a candidate so they don’t have a message.  I do get information from a number of their affiliate groups.  And every one contains an important survey or petition along with a request for money and a reminder of the doom which will befall the country if President Obama is reelected.

At any rate, the real campaign starts Labor Day.

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Uncategorized

A quick trip from Locke and Smith to Keynes and Krugman

(c) 2012 Earl L. Haehl Permission is given to use this article in whole as long as credit is given. Book rights are reserved.

This is part of a manifesto I was writing before I realized I’m too old to lead a social movement.

A free society depends, not upon its political class, but on a general understanding of its principles by the majority.  These principles do not reflect entitlements or “goodies” but rather opportunity and duty.

Along with the so called Tea Party, I believe we need to cut the power in Washington and the power to Washington.  We are engaged in a domestic battle which so far involves attempted government takeovers of health care, banking, education and industry.  There is also an attempted takeover of our Constitution which has been going on since 1901 with the repeal of the Militia Act of 1792.  Since 1968 there has been an increased attempt to federalize and militarize law enforcement.  But this goes back to the Benjamin Harrison/Grover Cleveland era and anti-trust legislation.
Progressives love the Commerce Clause of the Constitution and Alexander Hamilton. What they ignore is the agenda of Hamilton and Madison in the commerce clause itself. What Alexander Hamilton and James Madison wanted in the Commerce Clause was elimination of barriers to trade among the States–to be specific the states having power to restrict, whether by tariff or prohibition or unreasonable regulation, the lawful movement of goods from one location to another.  The example was that New York could not grant a preferred status to goods from New Jersey as opposed to Connecticut or Delaware by means of tariff and excise.  It had nothing to do with Federal Regulation of hours of work, wages or other terms and conditions of employment.  It had nothing to do with the regulation of sales of firearms or ammunition to individuals, with a federal scheme of licensing and regulating dealers, with regulation of medical equipment, with federal regulation of pharmaceuticals and the food supply.
If we go back to the areas for takeover, we can examine each.  We must realize that much of the industrial and banking infrastructure predates the progressive movement which some trace to Thomas Woodrow Wilson’s essay on the transcendent constitution.  It even predates Lincoln and the Transcontinental Railroad, as well as the Land Management Act.
Hamilton believed in the free flow of commerce to the extent that he supported the Democratic Republican/Clintonian candidate, Morgan Lewis, over the Democratic Republican/Federalist candidate, Aaron Burr.  Burr was of the Federalist faction like Hamilton, but had allied himself with the secessionist faction within the faction.  Hamilton realized that the dream of free commerce would be destroyed by a breakup of the Union and therefore he supported the successor of his old political enemy George Clinton.  There was bad blood between Hamilton and Burr regarding their banking rivalries–Burr’s family had incorporated the Manhattan company to provide water to Manhattan, but had also gotten authorization to issue notes.  They were on opposite sides of the National Bank debate.
Hamilton also believed in the excise power of the government.  He was influential in getting Congress to pass the gallonage tax on production of whiskey in 1791.  This was a cause of the 1794 Whiskey Insurrection.  In his papers he claims credit for inciting the rebellion because he felt it would demonstrate the inadequacy of reliance on militias rather than a national army.  The performance of Governor Lee and the combined militia force supplied by Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Connecticut disproved this on a small scale.  The excise power has been the subject of much mischief over the years as well as the commerce clause.
While this seems a digression, the study of history cannot be complete without the dots to connect unless you have a coloring book where the colors show up when you brush water on the sheet.  Much of the history taught in schools follows this latter pattern with the dyes drawn into the paper by leftist interpreters. The national bank proposal of Hamilton, for example, was only the first of many resulting in the Federal Reserve in 1913.  Hamilton, while a financial player, would probably not recognize the Creature from Jekyll Island.  Nor for that matter would Nicholas Biddle, David Crockett, William Henry Harrison or other 19th Century Whigs.
So let us start with the regulation of banking, Wall Street, mortgages, credit cards, etc. Back in the seventies and eighties (the 1980s–I’m not that old) there was a crisis in agricultural property foreclosures.  The banks were generally willing to work with the farmers but FmHA wanted to clean the books.  As usual Congress acted with the Emergency Farm Mortgage Act to help farmers delinquent on mortgages through the Farm Credit Service.
The fact is that a lot of farmers lost their land anyway.  An exception is that German anabaptist farmers (Mennonites, Amish, Brethren, Hutterites) did not have delinquencies or foreclosures because they avoided major debt.  They were able to purchase some foreclosed land which temporarily caused some resentment among the “English.”  This is an example of the banks following social mandates in lending and then having negative consequences for which they are blamed.  The primary culprits in the recent “mortgage meltdown” are the quasi-governmental twins (Freddie and Fannie) and the “affordable housing movement” which had the effect of putting people into properties they could not afford.
A friend of mine, the late John R Kuefel, observed that the whole federal loan program of student, home and business loans has the result of placing large numbers of individuals in a state of villeinage.  Villeins were indebted individuals whose freedom was limited by those holding the debts.  They were outside of society and considered to be of a criminal class, hence the term “villain.”  As an experiment try getting an exit visa or visa waiver to leave the United States if you are delinquent on a student loan.  For an example of the impact of villeinage on a society, read up on the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381.
Back in the eighties the Kansas Legislature passed a law requiring that the state pension fund make investments to increase local business development in Kansas.  Mainly they were looking a urban based development that was having trouble getting funding in the private market.  A number were also associates of the governor and legislators sponsoring the program.  The executive secretary of the pension fund recommended strongly against the legislation because it would compromise the fiduciary integrity of the system.  When, as usual, this turned out badly, the executive secretary took the fall.  A law professor with an impeccable reputation as a judge and cabinet officer (for the governor who supported and signed the bill) was appointed to investigate.  Charges were brought against some businessmen for defrauding the fund.  No culpability was assigned to either the governor or legislators who promoted the bill that opened the system up to the scam.
Pension funds took a hit in 2009 when the Obama Administration interjected itself into the bankruptcy proceedings of General Motors and Chrysler with proposals that benefited the United Auto Workers union to the detriment of stockholders.  The new beneficiaries are the “stakeholders” preferred by the regulating power.  Among the preferred stockholders who got left out were pension funds that are heavy investors.  There is a movement to nationalize all private and state pension funds.
Stock brokers began to be regulated after the “crash” of 1929 when the Federal Reserve, without a signal from the economy jacked up interest rates.  There was a panic on Wall Street and some of the reverberations came from the turning bones of Alexander Hamilton in the church yard at Broad and Wall.  The “crash” however did not start the Great Depression other than being about 17 months prior to the recession of 1931, the proximate cause of which was Smoot-Hawley tariff act.   As the recession was beginning to abate, Franklin Delano Roosevelt took office with a plan that involved Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins and National Recovery Administrator Hugh S. Jackson.  Their approach to the ills of the country was a massive set of federal agencies and regulations based on The Corporate State by Benito Mussolini.  The Commerce Clause ceased to be about the free flow of goods and services, and more about federal power to intervene in the employer-employee relationship.    This view of the Commerce Clause is best epitomized by William O. Douglas and William J. Brennan.  Brennan expanded his view of the Commerce Clause to include state and local governmental activities as “commerce.”
The twentieth century was all about War.  In 1898, the United States Congress, at the behest of William Randolph Hearst and Assistant (read Acting) Secretary of the Navy Theodore Roosevelt, declared war on Spain.  Roosevelt involved himself in the Cuba campaign which also doubled as the beginning of his campaign for Governor of New York.  McKinley was not in favor of a war but Congress declared it and at least he had Roosevelt out of his cabinet.  Roosevelt was planning to run for reelection for governor but the powers that be decided he could do less damage as vice president.  Unfortunately for the establishment, McKinley was assassinated and TR became a reality to be dealt with.  He continued the occupation of the Philippines, created the general staff, and sent the Great White Fleet around the world.  He was prepared to use the Marines to protect Panama’s “independence” to build a canal across the isthmus.  Out of the malaria that plagued the workers came the Public Health Service.  “I took the Canal Zone and let Congress debate about me.”
While there was a four year lag in the “progressive” movement under William Howard Taft. Then in 1913 Thomas Woodrow Wilson came into office largely as a result of the “Bull Moose” campaign of TR that took electoral votes and made Taft the second incumbent in history to come in third.  Wilson soon had the Federal Reserve act, the ratification of the income tax, the ratification of direct election of Senators, and troops in Mexico.
The sixteenth amendment says, “The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.” This basically gives the government the means to expand without raising tariffs and to engage in military adventurism,  The Wilson administration was responsible for the occupation of Mexico, our involvement in World War I, and the 1920 invasion of the Soviet Union to interfere with the Bolshevik revolution.  Also on the plate were the Sedition Act of 1917 and the Intelligence Bureau (modeled after the Soviet Cheka) to break up socialist and anarchist gatherings.
The post war economic downturn was due to loss of about 40 percent of the industrial work force between the “Great War” and the Camp Funston flu.  The first outbreak of the 1918 flu was at Camp Funston, Kansas.  What the government did about this downturn was, in a word, nothing.  The recession ran its course and by 1925, America was back at full production.  Admiral Yamamoto who took his master’s degree at Harvard warned Japan that America would ultimately triumph because of industrial might.
But after eight years of limited government in the twenties, the United States turned to Herbert Hoover, a Rooseveltian progressive.  Since that time the power struggle has basically been between styles of progressivism.  Kennedy and Reagan were Rooseveltian progressives (TR) with some conservative and occasional libertarian tendencies.  But it has been a steady movement of more alphabet soup agencies and restrrictions for the good of the people.   Remember castor oil?  It was part of every grandmother’s medicine chest and it was derived from the toxic castor bean,
So that is how we get from John Locke and Adam Smith to the disciples of John Maynard Keynes, J.K. Galbraith and Paul Krugman.
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